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Interdisciplinary Studies Core Courses: 302

    BIS 302 Interdisciplinary Inquiry

          BIS majors only (3 credits)

          Course Description

          Explores interdisciplinary and integration as applied to various approaches of human inquiry.

          Prerequisites

          Dual-concentration students must have:

  • An ASU GPA of 2.0 or better. 
  • 25 credit hours earned (sophomore standing).
  • Completed the university requirements for First-Year Composition.
  • Completed the General Studies MA requirement (usually MAT 142) with a grade of D or better.
  • Completed BIS 301 with a grade of C or better
  • Activation of “BIS eligibility student group” by a BIS advisor. 

          BIS Organizational Studies students must have: 

  • An ASU GPA of 2.0 or better.
  • 25 credit hours earned (sophomore standing)
  • Completed the university requirements for First-Year Composition
  • Completed the General Studies MA requirement (usually MAT 142) with a grade of D or better
  • Completed BIS 300 with a grade of C or better
  • Completed BIS 301 with a grade of C or better

Activation of “BIS eligibility student group” by a BIS Organizational Studies advisor

BIS 302 Interdisciplinary Inquiry
BIS 302 will teach you methods of interdisciplinary inquiry, ways in which we can discover new knowledge. Each section teaches you at least three methods, but the specific methods and how those methods are applied may differ. For more details, read the descriptions below. If you have questions, please contact the instructor.

BIS 302
An exploration of human inquiry, this course introduces you to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. In the process you will develop experience with the way problems may be investigated in the various fields of natural and physical sciences, the social and behavioral sciences, and the arts and humanities as you continue to build your awareness as an interdisciplinarian. Considering these modes of investigation will permit you to consider yourself and your concentration areas in a new light, improve your ability to be a critical consumer of research, and help build your “learning how to learn” skills which are important in making creative connections, integrating methods and information, solving problems, and maximizing opportunities—all useful in work and home life. You will attain these goals through active participation around lecture material, class discussions, in-class and out-of-class exercises, actively reading journal articles, and completing writing assignments.

BIS 302 Brian McCormack
Internet Only Section
These sections emphasize the value and importance of the intersection between multiple methods and interdisciplinary thinking in designing and conducting research. One half of the course is centered on simulated research. Individual assignments early in the course help students learn how to conduct interviews (qualitative method) and surveys (quantitative method). These assignments are then applied to simulated research in which several groups discuss and present the findings of their collective work in a combined interdisciplinary effort. The other half of the course is an individual research project which helps students learn, in part, how to do (this time not simulated) research, beginning with a literature review on a topic of their choosing. The instructor grades the literature review and students revise their paper and expand that work into a final paper which proposes (but does not carry out) interdisciplinary/multiple method research. The course also explains other methods (textual, historical, comparative, and so on). All of this is done with a clear understanding of the ethics of research and the philosophical and sociological foundations of research, especially in the context of interdisciplinary studies.

BIS 302 Kelly Nelson
In this section of BIS 302 you’ll be doing original research on a topic that interests you by integrating three methods: observation, content analysis, and survey. You can work by yourself, in a duo, or in a small group—your choice. The research reports will involve some basic math (calculating percentages or averages) and presenting information in graphs. The classes combine interactive lectures, hands-on projects, and small group workshops. There will be three online homework quizzes, three 1-page research reports, brief progress reports, an informal presentation, and a final four-page report.

BIS 302 Matthew Rodgers
This course explores interdisciplinarity and integration as applied to various approaches of scholarly inquiry. Building off some of the academic skills acquired in BIS 301, Interdisciplinary Inquiry advances you to the next step: an opportunity to explore, study, read, discuss and resolve questions within your own area(s) of concentration. Students will be required to choose a problem to investigate, and then set up and carry out a research study from start to finish. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be used to investigate interdisciplinary problems.

BIS 302 Michael Rubinoff
This course explores interdisciplinarity and integration as applied to various approaches of scholarly inquiry. Building off some of the academic skills acquired in BIS 301, Interdisciplinary Inquiry advances you to the next step: an opportunity to explore, study, read, discuss, and resolve questions within your own area(s) of concentration. The final product of this process will be a major addition to your professional ePortfolio: a well-crafted project with an Executive Summary as evidence of your research and writing skills.

BIS 302 Michael Feyrer
Introduces students to interdisciplinary (integrative) research methods, proceeding to an individualized project. With instructor guidance, students choose an issue/topic that resonates with their interests, then plan, develop and produce a university-level research paper.

BIS 302 Kathryn Terzano
In this section of BIS 302, we will begin with an introduction about why research matters and how to formulate research questions. We will then explore a number of research methods applicable to a variety of disciplines. You will design and carry out an original experiment of your choosing and present your results in a short report; you will work with existing survey data such as U.S. Census data (quantitative) and present your analysis in the form of an “infographic”; and finally, you will conduct an in-depth interview OR complete a field observation (qualitative), after which you will submit an interview transcript or your field notes as well as an analysis of your research. You will receive peer and instructor feedback on all your work. This course will help you to think critically about which methods work best in which situations.

BIS 302 Dave Thomas
This course will explore a number of research methods used across a wide range of disciplines. In particular, we will investigate general characteristics, approaches, strengths and weaknesses associated with statistical analysis, interviewing, observation, and the scientific method. An underlying theme will be critical thinking—challenging students to question their own assumptions by exploring common problems associated with everyday reasoning.